Virginia Workers’ Compensation – Definitions E Terms

These are commonly used workers’ compensation terms for the Commonwealth of Virginia that appear on the state workers’ compensation website. They are not legal advice. They’re general and meant to help you understand the terminology.

Electronic Data Interchange (EDI): This is the method used to exchange data electronically between the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission and those organizations that submit claims to it. It’s part of the standards of the International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions (IAIABC).

Employee: To be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits, an injured or ill worker has to be an employee. Whether someone is really an employee or just an independent contractor is often disputed. Virginia workers’ compensation requires that employees work for companies with three or more employees to be covered – though this provision can be voluntarily waived by the employer. Short-term workers, workers without a written contract and other workers can be considered employees under the right set of facts. An experienced workers’ compensation lawyer will help to try to show that the worker is an employee.

Employer: The person or entity who controlled how and where you worked.

Employer’s Application: A form used by the Employer/Claim Administrators to suspend or terminate an injured workers benefits or request other relief from the Commission.

Endorsement: An endorsement changes the terms of an existing insurance policy. Endorsements should be in writing. Changes include adding coverage for additional tasks or new locations or many other issues. It’s for the employer.

Expedited Hearing: Sometimes, the normal time for a hearing can take weeks or months. For some employees, this can cause economic hardship. When severe economic hardship is a real possibility, a request for an expedited hearing can be made in writing with the Commission’s Clerk’s office.

Experience Modifier: Like the classification code, the experience modifier is one of three factors that determine the workers’ compensation insurance premium. Within an industry, different employers have different track records (for claims and losses). Employers with fewer claims and lower losses generally get better insurance premium rates.

A Norfolk Workers’ Compensation Lawyer Can Help

Norfolk workers’ compensation attorney Joe Miller at Joe Miller Law, Ltd., will help you if you’ve been injured on the job or if you suffer from an occupational illness. He knows how to prepare a case by talking to witnesses, working with your doctors, and fighting the employer. He’ll work to make sure you’re not forced to return to work too soon. In cases of permanent injuries or death, he’ll work to maximize benefits. He knows how to handle the tough cases and the unreasonable insurance companies. For the experienced help you need on your side, contact Joe Miller Law, Ltd., today at (888) 694-1671.