How Do You Treat Broken Bones?

Broken bones: what can go wrong?

Workplace accidents can result in broken bones. For many injured North Carolina workers, a broken bone and especially multiple fractures can be very painful and may take a long time to heal. In the case of an extreme break, surgery may be necessary to properly position and fix the broken parts of the bone (bone reduction).

Sometimes, complications appear during the healing process requiring surgery or treatment of the infection. In most cases, the victim will be unable to work for a prolonged period of time and will only have limited mobility, the broken bone being held immobilized.

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How will a broken bone heal?

Whereas the most common fractures will heal well and leave no trace, the answer to this question depends on two principal factors:

  • The severity of the injury: This means the number of broken bones and bone parts, the location of the injury and the position of the separated parts;
  • The age and physical condition of the victim: Older people do not heal as well as younger ones, because the natural repair of bones by calcification weakens with age. Other factors influencing the healing process are the presence of other injuries, the muscle mass and physical strength of the patient.

The longer the mending process, the more difficult it will be for the injured worker to recover all his or her physical aptitudes. The immobilized body parts will need intensive rehabilitation exercises to regain their pre-accident muscle strength and fitness.

Who will pay for your medical treatment and loss of income?

Under the North Carolina workers’ compensation rules, the injured victim may be entitled to receive compensation for lost wages during his or her absence from work. Medical and rehabilitation costs should also be paid for by your employer’s insurance carrier.

It is important to make very detailed scans and X-ray tests to identify all the fractures and cracks you have sustained, some of which could be difficult to discover. Even if not immediately perceptible, they could have grave consequences at a later stage when it can be harder for you to link the problem to your work accident.

If you or a loved one has been injured at work, contact Joe Miller Law in Elizabeth City, where attorney Joseph Miller, Esq has been representing injured North Carolina workers for over 20 years. Call us today, at 757-455-8889 or toll-free at 888-694-1671 or contact us online for a FREE, no commitment discussion of your case.